Dissemination

Dissemination is an active strategy whereby investigators tailor key research findings and messages to a specific audience.

For General Audiences (passive)

Grant proposals often require a detailed knowledge translation and dissemination plan, prompting investigators to consider how they are going to share study findings ahead of time.

Knowledge dissemination, also known as end-of-grant knowledge translation (Straus, Tetroe, & Graham, 2013), has traditionally meant publishing in peer-reviewed journals or presenting findings at conferences.

While publications and presentations remain important outputs for academics, these passive strategies (i.e., diffusion) can be less effective for enhancing the uptake of evidence with non-academic knowledge users, such as frontline clinicians.

For Targeted Audiences (active)

Dissemination is an active strategy whereby investigators tailor key research findings and messages to a specific audience.

When planning dissemination, investigators may reflect on the goals, audience, strategies, expertise, and resources available (CIHR, 2014), as well as the messenger and relationship with knowledge users, barriers and facilitators, context, and how dissemination might be evaluated (Wilson, Petticrew, Calnan, & Nazareth, 2010).

Examples of dissemination strategies include social media, educational workshops, and consensus processes.

For further information, CIHR offers a helpful Guide to Knowledge Translation Planning at CIHR: Integrated and End-of-Grant Approaches.

If you need assistance planning dissemination or require support for publishing and presenting, please submit a service request form.

Dissemination -For General Audiences
Target audience